Massage Therapy

Did you know that British Columbia has the highest standard of accreditation for massage therapists in North America? In BC, registered massage therapists take 3000 hours of schooling over three years where they learn anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, neuroanatomy and pathology as well as a variety of hands on techniques. Any person using the title “Massage Therapist” or “Registered Massage Therapist” in BC must have completed this training and be registered with the College of Massage Therapists of BC which oversees all active massage therapists.

What to Expect in a Massage Therapy Treatment
Your massage therapy appointment will include a brief health history and interview so that I can gather information on your condition and any factors that might be contributing to pain and discomfort you are experiencing. The massage techniques that I use will be chosen based on how you are presenting and which techniques I think will be best for your situation. I generally use a combination of fascial manipulation, trigger point release, and neuromuscular therapy all combined with Swedish massage to make the potentially painful points a little more tolerable and to flush out your tissue during and after working more deeply. After the massage I will usually give one or two exercises or stretches based on your condition.

A Few Tips
While it may be uncomfortable to lie on the massage table with a full stomach,you also don’t want to arrive at your appointment hungry. Try to eat a small snack 30 minutes or so before your treatment time. Some people find that they are light headed or dizzy when getting off the table and an empty stomach can increase the chances of this happening.

It’s always a good idea to drink water after your treatment. This will help to flush out toxins which can be released when tissues that have been restricted for a long time are loosened. You also might find that your muscles feel tender after the massage if a lot of deep tissue work has been preformed. This is because there is a lot of circulation returning to the area creating a small amount of inflammation. Putting an ice pack on the area for 10 or 15 minutes a few hours after the treatment usually helps to decrease this discomfort. The tenderness should be gone by the second day after your appointment and will decrease with subsequent treatments.